Seas the Day in October – Being Energy E(fish)ent

“To waste, to destroy our natural resources, to skin and exhaust the land instead of using it so as to increase its usefulness, will result in undermining in the days of our children the very prosperity which we ought by right to hand down to them amplified and developed.”

Theodore Roosevelt

“Energy will be the immediate test of our ability to unite this Nation, and it can also be the standard around which we rally. On the battlefield of energy we can win for our Nation a new confidence, and we can seize control again of our common destiny.”

Jimmy Carter

Seas the days of October by minimizing your use of energy. Electricity may not appear to have much interaction with the ocean, (electricity and water don’t mix) but our energy use greatly affects the world around us. The generation of electrical power produces more pollution than any other industry. This pollution (as well as climate change resulting from the use of fossil fuels to produce energy) hurts the oceans. By saving energy we can save the seas.

Vanquish vampires.

Picture by Tom Raftery, flickr user traftery

Picture by Tom Raftery, flickr user traftery

When it gets closer to Halloween you may be more likely to see little vampires stalking the streets. But the vampires that are hurting the ocean are the ones in our houses. Vampire electronics are devices that suck power when they are plugged in, even when they aren’t being used! One common “vampire” is a cell phone charger which will use electricity, even when it’s not charging!

Annually vampire electronics cost the US more than $10 billion in energy costs. Quick Tip: You don’t need Buffy to slay these vampires. Simply unplugging devices when they are not in use works. You can also attach devices to a power strip and turn that off when you aren’t using them. That way you don’t have to unplug everything.

 

Learn about clean, green vampires.

Green energy sources – such as solar, wind, and geothermal – will never run out and are better for the environment. No wonder they are becoming more popular! Countries like Germany are making great use of solar power. In fact, Germany broke a record in June 2014 and at one point managed to get 50.6% of its energy from solar panels!

Green energy is the future, why not learn more about it and join the discussion today? The EPA also have a handy guide to purchasing green power, if you decide you want to join the green energy revolution!

A bright (light bulb) idea.

Saving electricity and the ocean can be as simple as turning off the lights when you are not in a room and installing LEDs next time you need to replace your light bulbs. Quick Tip: For more easy fixes around the house you can check out this list by national geographic.

A solar pumpkin. By Lenore Edman, flickr user lenore-m

A solar pumpkin. By Lenore Edman, flickr user lenore-m

 

Dark Halloween for the ocean.

This Halloween why not make things spooky for the sea! Turn off all the lights and electronics for the night and spend the time telling scary stories with flashlights or candles. You can save electricity and have a fun time.

Cover Photo by Pierre Lesage, flickr user tahitipix

 

The Seas the Day initiative encourages and empowers people to take ocean conservation personally. Each month, we feature a new conservation theme with ways to help so come back regularly for more ocean-helping ideas and tips!

Created mainly to support our partner ZAMs (Zoos, Aquariums, and Museums and other visitor-serving organizations involved in our growing network) in motivating conservation action, Seas the Day is for you to tailor for your own purposes. Please use any or all of the content verbatim and re-post on your own blog, social media channels, website, newsletter, etc. We have a large database of action tips and related content for you to use so let us know what’s most helpful and what other action-able types of information and resources we can provide to enhance your conservation efforts.

Posted in Blog Posts, Seas the Day and tagged , , , .

Caty Fairclough

Caty Fairclough is an intern at the Ocean Project. She's interested in social media and marketing and her favorite ocean animals are whale sharks!

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