Seas the Day February – Get connected!

The Seas the Day initiative encourages and empowers people to take ocean conservation personally. Each month, we feature a new conservation theme with ways to help so come back regularly for more ocean-friendly ideas and tips!

Created mainly to support our partner ZAMs (Zoos, Aquariums, and Museums and other visitor-serving organizations involved in our growing network) in their efforts to motivate conservation action with their visitors, Seas the Day is for you to tailor for your own purposes. Please use any of the content verbatim and re-post on your own blog, social media channels, website, newsletter, etc. We have a large database of action tips and related content for you to use. Let us know what’s most helpful and what other types of information and resources we can provide to enhance your efforts to motivate action for the ocean.

 

Get connected!

“I wish to do something Great and Wonderful, but I must start by doing the little things like they were Great and Wonderful”
― Albert Einstein

“A change is brought about because ordinary people do extraordinary things.” 
― Barack Obama

 “We don’t have to engage in grand, heroic actions to 
participate in the process of change. 
Small acts, when multiplied by millions of people, 
can transform the world.”
― Howard Zinn

In an age defined by technological advancements, mobile devices and social media, we are connected to the people near and far in more ways than one. Beyond just the digital world, however, it is important to remember the connections we also have with each other in our own communities. This February, discover (or rediscover) the connections you have in your own communities and explore the ways that your own communities are connected to the ocean. Performing small actions in your community in the name of conservation can accumulate to a world of change and to a better future for the ocean.

 

 Be Kind

sailors-and-pacific-missile-range-facility-personnel-pick-up-trash-during-a-beach-clean-up_l

Photo credit: Official U.S. Navy Imagery / Foter / CC BY

February 13th – 19th is Random Acts of Kindness Week. With this is mind, think about the acts of acts of kindness you can devote to the ocean this month. Get inspiration for acts of kindness and brainstorm and share your own ideas for giving back. Talk with local conservation organizations and ask about how you can lend a helping hand. Gather a group of your community members and pitch in to preserve your local environments. Clean-ups and habitat restoration projects in lakes, rivers, and beaches are rewarding ways to engage in the community! Check out the EPA’s catalog of watershed groups to learn about some of the organizations interested in protecting the local water bodies in your area.

 

Spread the Word

Communication is a powerful tool we can utilize to spread our ideas and thoughts to the world. Use words to your advantage and share your love for the ocean via writing. Share on Facebook, tweet about environmental issues, blog about ocean conservation, email community leaders, and write letters to the editor expressing your ocean-minded passions and concerns—the possibilities are endless! Here are some tips for using Twitter for science and conservation.

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Photo credit: Aristocrats-hat / Foter / CC BY-NC

Plan

World Ocean’s Day is June 8th and provides the perfect opportunity for a community to come together and share their love for the ocean. Spend some time now to organize a fun and engaging celebration for the ocean. Contact local organizations, get family and friends involved and check out the World Ocean’s Day page to learn more and get ideas!

Posted in Blog Posts, Seas the Day and tagged , , .

Jasmine McAdams

Jasmine started working as an intern for The Ocean Project in October 2013. She is a sophomore from Brown University studying environmental science, and is also involved in local environmental science education. With interests in education and outreach, Jasmine joined The Ocean Project team to gain insight into the global ocean conservation movement.

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